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Shabbat Shalom

Shabbat Shalom

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Kiddush Shabbat Candle Lighting Times

This week's Kiddush has not yet been sponsored.

Please contact the office if you would like to sponsor or co-sponsor this or next week's Kiddush or join the Kiddush Club. Kiddush is a great way to celebrate a birthday, anniversary, or other milestone. Call 631.351.8672.

Candle Lighting
Friday, March 24
6:52 PM

Shabbat Ends

Shabbat, March 25

7:52 PM

Torah Portion: Vayakhel-Pekudei 

Birthdays & Yahrtzeits A Bit of Humor

This Week's Birthdays
{To have your birthday listed here, please call the office}
Debra Steinberg, Jillian Friedlander
Mor Keshet, Michael Valdman
Jacob Glickstein, Cody Gross
Isabelle Epelbaum, Jason Scandlar
Matthew Weingarten, Corrine Valenti
Noah Gildin, Rosalyn Grubner
Alexa Sheinker, Jacob Lerman
Adah Ruben, Jolie Freedman

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

This Week's Yahrtzeits
{Based on Hebrew date}
Naftoli Frank
Pearl Elberg, Fannie Newmark
Esther Zauderer, Tsilia Chernobilsky
Pearl Elberg, Samuel Roberts
Augusta Laura Hausman, Gertrude Brainin
Jascha Horenstein, Albina Levine


MAY THEY BE REMEMBERED FOR BLESSING

See You Later  

Chaim  had this problem of getting up late in the morning and was always late for work.
After a few weeks of this, his boss was mad and threatened to fire him if he didn't do something about it. So Chaim went to his doctor, who gave him a pill and told him to take it before he went to bed. He got a great night's sleep and actually beat the alarm in the morning. After a leisurely breakfast, he cheerfully drove to work.
"Boss," he said, "the pill my doctor prescribed actually worked!"
"That's all fine," said the boss, "but where were you yesterday?"
 

A Smooth Criminal

One night Mrs. Eisenberg stumbled into her local Brooklyn police station with a black eye. She claimed she heard a noise in her back yard and went to investigate. The next thing she knew, she was hit in the eye and knocked out cold.
An officer was sent to her house to investigate, and he returned 1-1/2 hours later with a black eye.
"Did you get hit by the same person?" his captain asked.
"No," he replied. "I stepped on the same rake."

NEW AT THE CHAI CENTER
1. Join us this and every Friday night 10 minutes before services for a delicious taste of homemade cholent and a glass of scotch. This week we will join together at 6:00pm for food and drink, followed by Mincha and Kabbalat Shabbat.

2. PRAYER FOR DUMMIES. A NEW CLASS on Saturday mornings at 11:30am. This class led by Rabbi Eli Laufer is perfect for someone who wishes to get acquainted with the prayer book and prayer. Followed by Kiddush. 

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SAVE THE DATE! TRIP TO CROWN HEIGHTS
Sunday April 30th, The Chai Center will be hosting a trip to Crown Heights. Come see the hustle & bustle of the Chabad community. We will be visiting the grave site of the Rebbe, getting a tour of this little Shtetl, visiting Kosher fish and meat supermarkets, Judaica stores, Art galleries and more. We will finish the day with the evening Prayers, in the 770, the headquarters of the Chabad movement. Followed by supper in one of the hip and upcoming Kosher burger joints. Times, details and cost to be announced shortly, stay tuned.

TORAH AND BREAKFAST
Every Sunday morning at 9:30 AM, join us for Breakfast and the study of the weekly Torah portion, and take a lesson for our times the 21st century.

STARTING NEW! MUSIC GROUP
The Chai Center is looking to start a music group. 
After many people have expressed interest, will be starting a music group at The Chai Center. All instruments welcome. Every 3rd week we will get together, jam a little and learn a new song (or at least begin a new song). 
If you would like more info please email 
rabbieli@thechaicenter.com

Featured  

Junior Congregation – Join us every Saturday!
Did you know that the Chai Center has a new and improved Junior Congregation every Shabbat morning from 11:00 – 12:15.  The children have a great time and learn many fascinating things. Call Rabbi Dovid at 351-8672 if you have questions or just come.

Shabbat & Weekly Services This Week's Classes

SUNDAY MORNING 8:30 PM
MONDAY - FRIDAY MORNING 7:00 PM
FRIDAY EVENING 6:00 PM (Following Cholent & Whiskey)
SHABBAT MORNING 9:30 AM
JR CONGREGATION 11:00 AM
SATURDAY NIGHT 8:05 PM

SUNDAY 9:30 AM  BREAKFAST & TORAH CLASS
M-W-TH 8:00 – 8:30 AM TANYA
MONDAY 7:00 PM  CODE OF JEWISH LAW
MONDAY 7:45 PM  LIVING TORAH VIDEO CLASS
SHABBAT 9:00 AM TORAH PORTION: Practical implications
SHABBAT 11:30 AM  
PRAYER BOOK FOR DUMMIES

Business Spotlight  

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Thought for the Week

Story of the Week
The Miser’s Slippers

In a town lived a very rich miser. Every time the local rabbi came to his door to collect funds for the poor, the miser would invite the rabbi in, offer the rabbi a glass of tea and talk about his business. When the rabbi started talking about the plight of the poor people in the winter, the miser would brush him off and tell him that poor people like to complain—it wasn’t all as bad as the rabbi thought. In any case, he had no cash in the house at the moment, and couldn’t give anything right now. Could the rabbi come back another time? The miser would then escort the rabbi to the door, go back to his warm and comfortable room and settle down in his favorite chair near the fireplace, very pleased with himself.

But the rabbi was not pleased. The poor had no money for food or for wood for their stoves, and they were cold and hungry.

One evening the rabbi knocked on the rich miser’s door. It was a cold and miserable night; snow and sleet blew through the deserted streets. The miser asked the rabbi in, as usual. But the rabbi refused. “No,” he said, “I won’t be long.” And then he inquired after the miser’s health and after the health of his family, and asked him about his business, and spoke about the affairs of the community for a long time. The miser could not send the rabbi away, of course; he had opened the door for him himself. But he was getting quite uncomfortable. He had come to the door in his slippers and skullcap, dressed in a thin shirt and his house pants. The rabbi, wearing a warm coat with a fur lining, his biggest shtreimel covering his ears and heavy winter boots encasing his feet and legs, talked on and on. No, he didn’t want to come in. No, really, he was on his way. The miser’s toes became ice and stone.

Suddenly the miser understood. “Oh, Rabbi!” he cried. “Those poor people with no warm clothes or firewood for winter . . . I never knew. I never imagined it could be like this. This is miserable. It is horrible. I never knew, honestly! Something must be done!” He went into the house and returned with a purse full of gold coins. He wanted to go back to his fireplace as soon as he could. He needed hot tea. The rabbi thanked him and took the money. He too was cold after that long talk, but he didn’t mind. The poor people would have a good winter this year.

The miser changed his ways that night. He became a regular contributor to the rabbi’s funds for the poor, for poor brides, for poor students, for Passover money and for many other causes. He had learned a good lesson that night.

Chai Center Preschool

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Dear Families,

Since we are in the throes of celebrating the upcoming holiday of Passover, I decided to share with the children one of my fondest memories of the holiday. I explained to the children when I was a little girl, we would have Passover Seder at my grandparents’ house. One of the traditions we had was my grandfather hiding the Afikomen, (a piece of matzah) in a designated part of the house. Once the Seder was over, my grandfather would tell my brother and me to go find the Afikomen. After much searching (And he was pretty good at finding tricky hiding spots) one of us eventually found it and he gave us each a special treat!  

I think it is very important as grown-ups to share with our children the importance of tradition and rituals. They are acts we engage in, at a regular time, that have meaning for us. We look forward to these events and are disappointed when they do not occur. They are not just physical priority, but an emotional priority in our lives. They tie our children to generations past and generations to come through shared behaviors. Most importantly, rituals enable us to communicate the values we cherish in our children.

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Hebrew School, CTeen & STP

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Friendship Circle Highlights


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RSVP AS A VOLUNTEER OR PARTICIPANT info@NYFriendshipcircle.com

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Community Resources
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